Perfectly Roasted Turkey

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Perfectly Roasted Turkey

Introduction

With Thanksgiving upon us, in the U.S., and the holidays only a month away I thought it timely to share some turkey roasting tips.

Now that turkey can be found all year round, in everything from "bacon" to sandwiches, escalopes and sausages, it's important to take some extra care so that the holiday bird still has an edge. Turkey's current popularity is due to its low fat content; low fat all too often means tasteless.

Sourcing a good turkey is essential. In the U.S. I have used Dartagnan who offer a wide variety of birds including wild turkey, it doesn't come in a bottle :)
In the UK The Ginger Pig is an excellent supplier. Most good supermarkets offer free range birds both fresh and frozen.

Tagliatelle with Duck Ragu

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Duck Ragu

Introduction

In the autumn and winter I like to use whatever meat is plentiful in my ragu. Wild rabbit and wild boar (with bitter chocolate) are particular favourites, lamb shanks can be fantastic, goose too.

I made this version with duck legs mostly drumsticks, but you can substitute any of the meats mentioned above. The secret is to use cuts of meat that require long slow cooking.

Wild or domestic duck are equally good, but the wild bird will take longer to cook.

Escalopes with Prosciutto or Dry-Cured Ham

Turkey Escalope with Dry-Cured Ham

Introduction

A dish rich in flavours but easy to prepare, I have been making this version for several years.

I like to use Turkey or chicken escalopes as they have a subtle flavour and absorb the other flavours used, but pork or veal will also work.

We were reading through Elizabeth David's 'Summer Cooking' yesterday, it was first published in 1955. It was surprising to discover that she had already started discussing the advantages of free-range poultry back then.

Duck Prosciutto

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Duck Prosciutto

Introduction

When I take out a duck prosciutto and cut thin slices off of it, people are amazed and delighted that something so complex in flavour can be prepared at home.

I am preparing a couple, one plain, one spiced this week, so that the students on our Fruits of the Garden course can taste what to expect from the fruits of their labour.

If you are thinking about home-curing this is a great place to start. The resulting prosciutto is rich, has great depth and best of all you will see the results in just over a week.

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